Serenity Sunday: Cabot Tower and Signal Hill in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada


Come visit Signal Hill, a national historic site, in one of the oldest cities in North America. I took these photographs back in 2014 but not much changes on Signal Hill, ever!

seen from several points in the city, this is Cabot Tower, it sits atop Signal Hill and was a strategic defense location for millennia
A closer shot of the famous Cabot Tower on Signal Hill
An aerial view of the hill and its defenses
From the seventeenth century to the Second World War, Signal Hill defended the city
The Queen’s armory where munitions and cannon balls were stored
A close up shot of the armoury
Signal Hill was a natural defense location, but it is also a place of great beauty and views
Inside Cabot Tower a narrow spiral staircase winds upstairs where visitors can get a better view of the harbour and surrounding area as well as getting a feel for how things were operated in the early days when the tower was first constructed
In 1901, Guglielmo Marconi received the first trans-Atlantic wireless message at a position near Cabot Tower
The main floor of Cabot Tower features historical information about the tower itself and Signal Hill and the city of St. John’s
There are hiking trails for the courageous and stellar views to be had from the hill
Overlooking St. John’s harbour, it is easy to see how Signal Hill was strategic in defense of the city
Cabot Tower stands guard over “the narrows” in St. John’s harbour
St. John’s harbour remains a busy port city to this day
Another view of the harbour from Signal Hill
St. John’s was named on maps dating from 1519
No matter where you turn on Signal Hill there are beautiful sights to see
Light houses warned sailors of the rocky shores

The Conversation


The conversation 2

 

“Come, rest upon my petals here and tell me of your story.

Where have you been, My little friend?”

Said the flower to the moth

“I roam high above, where you can never go.

I visit plants and trees and flowers sweet everywhere I travel,”

Said the moth to the flower.

“Oh, to fly up high, to soar upon the winds.

To not be planted in one place, to see beyond the wall.”

Sang the flower to the moth.

“Aw, but you are treasured, for your beauty and your scent.

No worries about foes like birds that would eat you, if they could,”

Said the moth to the flower.

“There are pros and cons to every Life,”

Continued he to she. The moth thought to comfort her with his words so wise

And yet the flower pined and pined for freedom to travel far.

“It’s true, I am admired, and watered every day, but if you think me safe right here

You know not all my visitors,” replied the flower,

“For there are bugs that chew my leaves, And spiders everywhere. Not to mention

honey bees That feed upon my nectar.”

“Aw, so you serve this world,

Nourishing the pollinator,” the moth cried out.

“Oh silly moth, I know the truth – that you as well

Pollinate us flowers,” she answered,

“And so, you see, we have need of thee.

When you brush your soft, soft wings

Against my little petals, you do more than tickle me

Like some ethereal feather. And when you chance to nibble me

And drink deeply of my nectar,” she shyly whispered, “you too carry my

Essence to continue seed production.”

The moth stretched out his wings and proudly strutted his stuff

He thought about all the good he did and didn’t remember why

Venus flytrap chewed up his kind, that naughty, naughty flower.

It was because the caterpillar he once was did damage to her leaves

and ruined her every finery….

The flower knew this, but did not say, for his friendship she treasured

After what seemed a lengthy pause, the moth did once more speak

“We each do our part, to bring beauty to this world, and I will speak to north wind

And ask him when you’re ready, to blow your petals far above the wall so you can see

The wonders of this world,” the moth proclaimed.

And so, it came to be, that during summer’s warmest days the flower bloomed and blossomed. But in the fall the north wind kept his promise and lifted high her petals. She traveled far beyond the wall and lived at last her dream.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little Port Harmon, Bay St. George, in Stephenville, NL, Canada


Little Port Harmon is a deep sea harbour in Stephenville, Newfoundland. It is one well known to fisher persons on the  West coast of the island. Situated in the town of Stephenville it has been home to fishing vessels and  cargo ships and is no stranger to factory freezer ships. Battle ships have also been spotted here as well as in ports and bays around the province. During the Second World War the Americans constructed an air strip in Stephenville and built a military base here. For many years “Harmon Day” was celebrated every summer. It continues to be an event that is held intermittently every few years.

According to the Stephenville Historical Society the white cliff known as Indian Head is a type of rock found in few places on earth. Anorthosite, the rock that makes up a large percentage of the cliff, is about a million years old and is among the oldest known in the province.

Beautiful Burgeo, Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada


The community of Burgeo is located on Grandy Island on the Southwest coast of the island of Newfoundland and is a gorgeous spot to visit. It is a small town with a population of just 2000 people with a provincial park nearby where you can camp, swim,  fish or walk the trails and gorgeous coastline. If you care to visit Francois, a small island where there are no cars, you can take a ferry from Burgeo to visit this small community. I did not get to visit Francois, but hope to one day. These photographs were taken in 2013 during our visit to Burgeo.

Respite in the Rockies of Alberta


During our enforced evacuation from Fort McMurray we stayed at Sylvan Lake, AB with our son and daughter-in-law, who had been married a short time. It was a restful spot, but we felt the honeymooners needed a bit of space so we decided to spend a few days in Canmore. It is a spectacular place nestled within Banff National Park. No matter where you go in Canmore you cannot escape the view of the mountains that surround the town. I was a little disappointed that the weather was not cooperating. It was damp and overcast, but the sun did come out on our final day there. Majestic does not begin to describe the mountains or the feelings of awe and wonder that filled my soul. Here are a few photos from our visit. I hope you will enjoy them.