Serenity Sunday: Port Harmon in Stephenville, NL, Canada


My daughter-in-law sent me a Newfoundland classic for supper today: cod and potatoes with drawn butter. It made me think of back home, the place where I was born and raised. I live in Alberta now and there is much to love about this place that I now call home. Still, I get reminiscing about the island I still love. I do miss the ocean with its constant changes and moods. These were taken at Port Harmon, the deep port in Bay St. George, and part of the town of Stephenville on the island’s west coast.

This anchor has sat at the harbour for many, many years. I remember my Dad taking us to Port Harmon to see the ships docked there. This anchor looms large in my memories.
We could see these limestone cliffs across the bay in Port au Port, where I grew up. The stone is quite light and shimmers in the sun.
Driftwood of all sizes line the beaches
A long stone jetty reaches out into the bay at little Port Harmon
There is beauty as the seaside, even in the foggiest weather
I loved walking along the rocky beach and listening to the waves crash ashore
The power of the ocean waters can uproot trees along the seashore, especially where erosion takes place
I really wanted to drag this piece home for the yard. It had such interesting form.
Small fishing boats come into harbour with their loads of fish, shrimp, crab, lobster and more…nothing like fresh seafood!
Right before a storm, the skies were a rich variety of hues of blue and grey – it was amazing to see and to hear the waves crashing upon the beach. Nature is so awesome to witness….
While the skies were darkening quickly in one direction, looking the other way it was almost serene in its beauty and majesty
Where the sky meets the sea there is always, always magic

Small disappointments, but hope prevails


I was so excited to catch sight of a pair of Common Goldeneye Ducks down on the pond last evening. It’s a sure sign of spring and I had been looking forward to their return. I snapped off a couple of photographs from our balcony, unfortunately they’re not the best quality as I was soooo excited to see them.

Hearty pair of Common Goldeneye visiting the pond, even with ice still in evidence, one had dived under water, looking for food, perhaps?

I went out for a walk around the pond this morning to see if I could get better shots, alas I was disappointed – they were nowhere to be seen. But they may have been hiding in the long grasses and bulrushes that surround the pond.

Bits of ice and snow on the pond, but the weather is warm today so hopefully it will all be melted by day’s end.

However, I did chance upon a raven having a chat with his friend the magpie:

I think Raven was throwing his head back and laughing at something Magpie had told him

I am hopeful of seeing the ducks return again. Last week I saw a pair of Canada Geese flying overhead so spring is definitely underway and I am grateful. It’s been a long winter!

Earth Day 2020


In the midst of a pandemic all reports are that while people are self isolating the earth is breathing more easily and, hopefully, healing. I hope that wherever you live you are able to appreciate the beauty and the blessings of our little blue planet. These are photographs that I took in 2014 just outside Stephenville, Newfoundland, Canada, in the small community of Noel’s Pond.

It was around 5 a.m. as we were driving along the West coast of the island of Newfoundland. Mists hovered above the waters of Noel’s Pond as the sun was rising. It was so breathtakingly beautiful and I can still see it in my mind’s eye.
Noel’s Pond is situated just outside Stephenville, NL. Canada.

Dancing in my dreams


Moon beams dancing upon rooftops

How I wish I could join in

Weary legs, broken feet

Dance only in memories

Moon beams competing with the sun

No way to outshine that heated glory

And I, with worn body feel her pain.

She just doesn’t have it in her

To light the world that way

Moonbeams, does she not yet know

How she feeds our souls

And I, with my youth long spent,

Gaze up into the night skies

Wishing to touch the moon

For her glory, too, is faded

When compared with a sun so bright

So age to youth is seen

A pale shadow of what was once

And yet, and still, there’s a soul dance

Like moon beams on rooftops

And still alive am I

Dancing in my dreams

Serenity Sunday: Cabot Tower and Signal Hill in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada


Come visit Signal Hill, a national historic site, in one of the oldest cities in North America. I took these photographs back in 2014 but not much changes on Signal Hill, ever!

seen from several points in the city, this is Cabot Tower, it sits atop Signal Hill and was a strategic defense location for millennia
A closer shot of the famous Cabot Tower on Signal Hill
An aerial view of the hill and its defenses
From the seventeenth century to the Second World War, Signal Hill defended the city
The Queen’s armory where munitions and cannon balls were stored
A close up shot of the armoury
Signal Hill was a natural defense location, but it is also a place of great beauty and views
Inside Cabot Tower a narrow spiral staircase winds upstairs where visitors can get a better view of the harbour and surrounding area as well as getting a feel for how things were operated in the early days when the tower was first constructed
In 1901, Guglielmo Marconi received the first trans-Atlantic wireless message at a position near Cabot Tower
The main floor of Cabot Tower features historical information about the tower itself and Signal Hill and the city of St. John’s
There are hiking trails for the courageous and stellar views to be had from the hill
Overlooking St. John’s harbour, it is easy to see how Signal Hill was strategic in defense of the city
Cabot Tower stands guard over “the narrows” in St. John’s harbour
St. John’s harbour remains a busy port city to this day
Another view of the harbour from Signal Hill
St. John’s was named on maps dating from 1519
No matter where you turn on Signal Hill there are beautiful sights to see
Light houses warned sailors of the rocky shores

Easter eve


Just a few photographs this very different Easter weekend. I hope they bring a bit of cheer. Please know I keep you all in my thoughts and prayers. Be well. Stay safe. And please, stay home.

I took this down the street from where we live as the sun set over the athletic park. It is cold here this evening in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. As the sun sets this Holy Saturday I am praying for all peoples of the world and for renewed hope and faith in a bright and beautiful future for us all.
Nothing says spring like Tulips. My daughter took this photo of the tulips she bought at the supermarket to decorate the table for Easter. Photo by Anastacia Hopkins
a Calla Lily plant my daughter bought me for Easter – symbol of new life!

Happy Easter to you all and Happy Spring! May your blessings be numerous and your sorrows be few!

Sing of spring: More birds


All of the photos featured in this post were taken by my firend, nature enthusiast, Kathy Marche. She takes phenomenal photographs around the Stephenville/Port au Port areas in Newfoundland, Canada. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

“Whatcha looking ay, Willis”
Nuthatches seem to be natural acrobats
This one seems to have earned its stripes (sorry for the bad pun)
Birds are great at hiding in plain sight
An American Bald Eagle on the hunt
Black-capped Chickadee, one of my personal favourites, though very common and found pretty much everywhere, their friendly curiosity and cheerful song is always a delight
an exceptional shot of a Boreal Chickadee
Kathy caught this Canada Jay as it was jumping from branch to branch
Another shot the pretty little Canada Jay a.k.a. Gray Jay
Downy Woodpecker – they sure can make a racket but nice to see
Finches are common as well, but also lovely to hear
Perched and perfectly positioned to have a look around
Naturally, gulls are a common sight around Newfoundland waters. This one is a great black-backed gull
Hairy Woodpecker (female)
Hairy Woodpecker (male)
nice close up of a Hairy Woodpecker
Herring Gull
Herring Gull – though some people consider gulls a nuisance I always enjoyed seeing them circling overhead and squawking to one another
Iceland Gull
Mourning Dove
Pine Grosbeak (male)
Pine Grosbeak (female)
Purple Finch (doesn’t it look like it had its feathers styled punk? haha)
“Here get my good side”
Red and White-winged Crossbills
Red breasted Nuthatch
Red-breasted Nuthatch – so pretty
An immature Red Crossbill preening his feathers
White-winged Crossbill
Snow Bunting
Snow Bunting
And back to the Chickadees – just because I love them so 🙂
Since we began with a Nuthatch I guess it makes sense to “end” with one. And now this “tale” is done.

My sincere thanks and deepest gratitude, Kathy, for allowing me to feature some of your stunning photographs on my blog. I hope my readers enjoy them.