Sacred Trust


Sacred trust

That space where we find you

Waiting

Waiting for us to let go of fears

frustrations

And impatience

Trust

A blessed gift

That

Once opened

Releases

Goodness

Chases away

All shadows

And darkness

O God

Grant us the gift

Of unshakeable trust

And faith

Like a rock

Steady and strong

Grant us now

Sacred trust

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Rebuilding..


Beautiful words of wisdom from a beautiful soul

Color & Light

Watching the images of Notre Dame in flames yesterday gave me flashbacks to 9-11, especially when the tall spire came tumbling down. It also brought me back to Miami after Hurricane Andrew.  I distinctly remember getting lost trying to find my way home because every familiar landmark had toppled over or was missing. It will take some time for Parisians to internalize the unsettling visual reality left in the wake of the fire.

Health, relational and job crises can have the same effect on us personally. The life-landscape we once were so comfortable in suddenly looks foreign and feels disorienting. Important things we took for granted are missing; a sense of extreme vulnerability can take hold.

The good news is that Miami was rebuilt, there’s a beautiful tower in NYC and a new spire will one day rise over a renovated Notre Dame. Human resiliency, adaptability, hopefulness and the capacity…

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Home at last!


It’s been a long hard road to travel, but after nine weeks in hospital my husband and I are finally home at last. I am so grateful for the people who shared my trials during his hospital stay. I am grateful for the daily phone calls with my siblings; For the many kind words delivered via social media. And I am grateful for new friends who supported and sympathized with me while they themselves were walking the same or a similar road.

Yes, we are home. Is he better? No, he is not, but he is no longer in a crisis situation, which, again, I am very grateful for. Our first day back at home had me awakening to the sound of the thud as he fell to his knees on our bedroom floor. No, he was not hurt, but it is an example of how he is not really ‘better’. The dizziness remains, and most likely will form daily living for as long as life lasts. This is not new; he has been living with this condition for a few years now. I had hoped the doctors could find some magic pill that would take it away. Sadly, that is not to be. It is simply one more side effect of diabetes. It places severe limitations on what he can and cannot do. I sigh, but I met so many wonderful people during hubby’s hospitalization – people who are enduring much more and much worst conditions.  Yes, we had to face several disappointments. Yet, while his quality of life is much constrained, he is at least alive to tell the tales of his adventures in the health care system.

His kidneys failed while in hospital and he is now on dialysis and will likely be for the rest of his life, though doctors tell us miracles can happen and there is a possibility of his kidney function returning – it is a possibility but not a probability. Still, he is still here beside me and I am so very grateful for each moment of each and every day. And it is good to be home at last.

Unlearning What To Say & Do


Words of wisdom from a truly kind and compassionate soul.

A NEW NORMAL: Living & Loving Your Life After Loss

What’s one of the first things we’re told when we experience loss as young children? When something disappoints us, or our feelings get hurt, or perhaps a more serious loss occurs, such as the death of a pet or a beloved human?

“Don’t cry, honey,” or “Don’t feel bad.” The hidden message is, “Whatever you’re feeling right now is not OK.” Of course, parents and other authority figures don’t intend for that to be the message, but the harm is done nonetheless.

“If you’re going to cry, go to your room.” If someone else is sad we’re told to “give them space” or “leave them alone.” Again, the message is certain feelings are not for public consumption, and that “bad” feelings are to be experienced in isolation. So when we experience loss and respond with sadness and tears, many of us automatically seek a private place, or cover our faces…

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A vigil ended


A mist hangs over the city

The dampness seeps deep into my bones

Lamplight in the predawn hours

Casts a golden sheen on last year’s dry leaves

Shadows creep across wet parking lots

Slowly the city awakens as street lamps go out

And the smell of coffee permeates my nostrils

The vigil of the night is over

And I stumble to my bed to rest

At long last

Soon


In the concrete jungle

Where sky scrapers block the sun

Where blue skies are but patches

In a world of grey stone

My soul thirsts and hungers

For green trees and birdsong

For running waters

That flow over rocks and stones

Here in this city

I feel small and alone

Memory brings me back

To oceans deep and wild

To the towering mountains

And emerald valleys lush and kind

Soon, I whisper

Soon I will be there

Where rivers rush to meet their mother

And waves crash on the shore

Soon, I promise myself

Envisioning sand between my toes

Where no cement unbending

Cause my soles to hurt

My soul too, hurts

But soon this will be

Just another memory

Of my travels through this life

Soon

Let hope rise


Living in limbo

The answers yet to come

Anxiety holds sway

But for this moment only

For this I know:

Doubt may well be

Part and parcel of our humanity

Yet, hope will rise, again and again

A divine gift that buoys us up

In every storm

Weary soul, do not give up

Not yet, not now, not ever

Hope will sustain us

Let it rise

Let it fill every cell of your being

And let your worries fall away